posts tagged "universe"

reblog   source:gifmovie  megacosms   notes:15385   posted:2 years ago   tags:animation  gif  universe  space  
A rare and exotic mineral, so unusual that it was thought impossible to exist, came to Earth on a meteorite, according to an international team of researchers led by Princeton University scientists. The discovery provides evidence for the extraterrestrial origins of the world’s only known sample of a naturally occurring quasicrystal.  

Found in a rock collected in a remote corner of far eastern Russia, the natural quasicrystal was most likely formed during the early days of the solar system, roughly 4.5 billion years ago, making the mineral perhaps older than the Earth itself, according to the research team. The results, which come three years after the team identified the mineral as the first natural quasicrystal, recently were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.   
Although quasicrystals are solid minerals that look quite normal on the outside, their inner structure makes them fascinating to scientists. Instead of the regularly repeating clusters of atoms seen in most crystals, quasicrystals contain a more subtle and intricate atomic arrangement involving two or more repeating clusters. As a result, a quasicrystal’s atoms can be arranged in ways that are not commonly found in crystals, such as the shape of a 20-sided icosahedron with the symmetry of a soccer ball.
reblog   source:dailygalaxy.com   notes:22   posted:2 years ago   tags:quasicrystal  mineral  alien  extraterrestrail  space  earth  russia  princeton university  princeston  meteorite  metor  universe  rock  

A rare and exotic mineral, so unusual that it was thought impossible to exist, came to Earth on a meteorite, according to an international team of researchers led by Princeton University scientists. The discovery provides evidence for the extraterrestrial origins of the world’s only known sample of a naturally occurring quasicrystal.

Found in a rock collected in a remote corner of far eastern Russia, the natural quasicrystal was most likely formed during the early days of the solar system, roughly 4.5 billion years ago, making the mineral perhaps older than the Earth itself, according to the research team. The results, which come three years after the team identified the mineral as the first natural quasicrystal, recently were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Although quasicrystals are solid minerals that look quite normal on the outside, their inner structure makes them fascinating to scientists. Instead of the regularly repeating clusters of atoms seen in most crystals, quasicrystals contain a more subtle and intricate atomic arrangement involving two or more repeating clusters. As a result, a quasicrystal’s atoms can be arranged in ways that are not commonly found in crystals, such as the shape of a 20-sided icosahedron with the symmetry of a soccer ball.

Love

What if love is an actual force in the universe responsible for bonding atoms together and that’s why we are drawn to each other?

The longest lunar eclipse in over ten years animated the night sky on December 10. The red hue resulted from the sun’s light passing through the earth’s atmosphere. Viewers in Asia had the best view of the total eclipse, while those watching in Europe saw part of it at moonrise, and North Americans caught part of it as the moon set. It was not visible in South America or Antarctica. The next total eclipse will occur in 2014.

Click for more amazing photos: (27 photos total)
http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2011/12/lunar_eclipse_of_december_10_2.html

You’re looking at a brand new view of the lunar farside, as never seen  before.  The team from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has released the  first version of a topographic map of nearly the entire Moon, from data  from the Wide Angle Camera (WAC) on the spacecraft.
“This amazing map shows you the ups and downs over nearly the entire  Moon, at a scale of 100 meters across the surface, and 20 meters or  better vertically,” said principal investigator Mark Robinson, writing  on the LROC website.  “Despite the diminutive size of the WAC (it fits in the palm of one’s hand), it images nearly the entire Moon every month.”
reblog   source:universetoday.com   notes:26   posted:2 years ago   tags:moon  space  universe  solar system  

You’re looking at a brand new view of the lunar farside, as never seen before. The team from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has released the first version of a topographic map of nearly the entire Moon, from data from the Wide Angle Camera (WAC) on the spacecraft.

“This amazing map shows you the ups and downs over nearly the entire Moon, at a scale of 100 meters across the surface, and 20 meters or better vertically,” said principal investigator Mark Robinson, writing on the LROC website. “Despite the diminutive size of the WAC (it fits in the palm of one’s hand), it images nearly the entire Moon every month.”

cwnl:

Science Wins: Hammer Versus Feather on the Moon

If you drop a hammer and a feather together, which reaches the ground first?

On the Earth, it’s the hammer, but is the reason only because of air resistance? Scientists even before Galileo have pondered and tested this simple experiment and felt that without air resistance, all objects would fall the same way.

Galileo tested this principle himself and noted that two heavy balls of different masses reached the ground simultaneously, although many historians are skeptical that he did this experiment from Italy’s Leaning Tower of Pisa as folklore suggests. A good place free of air resistance to test this equivalence principle is Earth’s Moon, and so in 1971, Apollo 15 astronaut David Scott dropped both a hammer and a feather together toward the surface of the Moon.

Sure enough, just as scientists including Galileo and Einstein would have predicted, they reached the lunar surface at the same time. The demonstrated equivalence principle states that the acceleration an object feels due to gravity does not depend on its mass, density, composition, color, shape, or anything else. The equivalence principle is so important to modern physics that its depth and reach are still being debated and tested even today.

Image Credit: Apollo 15 Crew, NASA

wp-universo-12 by perez1194, found on Flickr http://flic.kr/p/awjomH
reblog   notes:10   posted:2 years ago   tags:photography  flickr  art  wp-universo-12  space  nebula  galaxy  universe  

wp-universo-12 by perez1194, found on Flickr http://flic.kr/p/awjomH

hubble10 by perez1194, found on Flickr
reblog   notes:67   posted:2 years ago   tags:photography  flickr  art  hubble10  space  nebula  galaxy  universe  

hubble10 by perez1194, found on Flickr

Galaxia by perez1194, found on Flickr
reblog   notes:26   posted:2 years ago   tags:photography  flickr  art  Galaxia  space  nebula  galaxy  universe  

Galaxia by perez1194, found on Flickr

Galaxia-1024x768-141060 by perez1194, found on Flickr
reblog   notes:8   posted:2 years ago   tags:photography  flickr  art  Galaxia-1024x768-141060  space  nebula  galaxy  universe  

Galaxia-1024x768-141060 by perez1194, found on Flickr

galaxia_antenae by perez1194, found on Flickr
reblog   notes:6   posted:2 years ago   tags:photography  flickr  art  galaxia_antenae  space  nebula  galaxy  universe  

galaxia_antenae by perez1194, found on Flickr

the-eagle-nebula by perez1194, found on Flickr
reblog   notes:10   posted:2 years ago   tags:photography  flickr  art  the-eagle-nebula  space  nebula  galaxy  universe  

the-eagle-nebula by perez1194, found on Flickr

heart-of-love (by perez1194)
reblog   source:Flickr / perez9411   notes:52   posted:2 years ago   tags:universe  space  love  heart  planet  saturn  galaxy  meteor  earth  

heart-of-love (by perez1194)

reblog   source:thisyouniverse.com   notes:43   posted:2 years ago   tags:art  lsd  psychedelic  saturn  planet  universe  space  
cwnl:

‘Jaw-Dropping!’ Crab Nebula’s Powerful Beams Shock Astronomers
An artist’s conception of the pulsar at the center of the Crab Nebula, with a Hubble Space Telescope photo of the nebula in the background. Researchers using the VERITAS telescope array have discovered pulses of high-energy gamma rays coming from this object.
Image Credit: David A. Aguilar / NASA / ESA
When astronomers detected intense radiation pumping out of the Crab Nebula, one of the most studied objects in space, at higher energies than anyone thought possible, they were nothing short of stunned.
The inexplicably powerful gamma-rays came from the very heart of the Crab Nebula, where an extreme object called a pulsar resides.
“It was totally not expected — it was absolutely jaw-dropping,” Andrew McCann, a Ph.D. candidate at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and a co-author of the new study, told SPACE.com. “This is one of the hottest targets in the sky, so people have been looking at the Crab Nebula for a long time. Now there’s a twist in the tale. High-energy rays coming from the nebula are well-known, but coming from the pulsar is something nobody expected.”
Read More

I’m not sure I understand the shock. It’s really cool, but wasn’t it already known that pulsars blast gamma rays?
reblog   notes:147   posted:2 years ago   tags:Science  News  Astronomy  Space  Crab nebula  Pulsar  Universe  

cwnl:

‘Jaw-Dropping!’ Crab Nebula’s Powerful Beams Shock Astronomers

An artist’s conception of the pulsar at the center of the Crab Nebula, with a Hubble Space Telescope photo of the nebula in the background. Researchers using the VERITAS telescope array have discovered pulses of high-energy gamma rays coming from this object.

Image Credit: David A. Aguilar / NASA / ESA

When astronomers detected intense radiation pumping out of the Crab Nebula, one of the most studied objects in space, at higher energies than anyone thought possible, they were nothing short of stunned.

The inexplicably powerful gamma-rays came from the very heart of the Crab Nebula, where an extreme object called a pulsar resides.

“It was totally not expected — it was absolutely jaw-dropping,” Andrew McCann, a Ph.D. candidate at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and a co-author of the new study, told SPACE.com. “This is one of the hottest targets in the sky, so people have been looking at the Crab Nebula for a long time. Now there’s a twist in the tale. High-energy rays coming from the nebula are well-known, but coming from the pulsar is something nobody expected.”

Read More

I’m not sure I understand the shock. It’s really cool, but wasn’t it already known that pulsars blast gamma rays?

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∞ I don't believe anything is impossible.
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