posts tagged "nature"

cwnl:

Infinite Cave in Vietnam

The amazing photo featured above was taken in a huge cavern complex within the bowels of central Vietnam – in Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park. During the spring of 2009, a team of spelunkers began exploring a mountain river cave in Vietnam and discovered a passage carved by a subterranean river millions of years ago.

Like a castle on a knoll, a limestone formation shines beneath a skylight in Hang Son Doong Cave. A monsoon storm had just filled the pool in the foreground, signaling that exploring season was ending. Referred to as the “infinite cave” this underground labyrinth is more than 2.5 mi long (4.0 km).

Photographer: Carsten Peter/©National Geographic Magazine

Summary Author: Mark Jenkins/©National Geographic Magazine
reblog   notes:10651   posted:2 years ago   tags:Science  Nature  Landscape  Geology  Geography  Cave  

cwnl:

Infinite Cave in Vietnam

The amazing photo featured above was taken in a huge cavern complex within the bowels of central Vietnam – in Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park. During the spring of 2009, a team of spelunkers began exploring a mountain river cave in Vietnam and discovered a passage carved by a subterranean river millions of years ago.

Like a castle on a knoll, a limestone formation shines beneath a skylight in Hang Son Doong Cave. A monsoon storm had just filled the pool in the foreground, signaling that exploring season was ending. Referred to as the “infinite cave” this underground labyrinth is more than 2.5 mi long (4.0 km).

Photographer: Carsten Peter/©National Geographic Magazine

Summary Author: Mark Jenkins/©National Geographic Magazine

cwnl:

The Majestic Circumzenithal Arcs

The circumzenithal arc, CZA, is the most beautiful of all the halos. The first sighting is always a surprise, an ethereal rainbow fled from its watery origins and wrapped improbably about the zenith. It is often described as an “upside down rainbow” by first timers. Someone also charmingly likened it to “a grin in the sky”.

Look straight up near to the zenith when the sun if fairly low and especially if sundogs are visible. The centre of the bow always sunwards and red is on the outside.

blindvisionproductions:

Fibonacci sequence and the Golden Ratio

Iguanas love the rocks in Tulum

A Coati is a kind of mix between a raccoon and an anteater about the size of a cat and it lives in Tulum, Mexico.

In the video I took you can see how http://thecutethulhu.tumblr.com/ got such a close up.

Wild Coati in Tulum, Mexico. It didn’t seem to care we were there, in fact it walked right past http://thecutethulhu.tumblr.com/ while she took close up pictures of it.

A Coati is kind of like a mix between an anteater and raccoon.


  Iridescent Clouds Over Aiguille de la Tsa
  
  Before the sun rose over the mountains, iridescent colors danced across the sky. The unexpected light show was caused by a batch of iridescent clouds, and captured on film in early September in Arolla, Wallis, Switzerland.
  
  Credit & Copyright: Ute Esser (U. Heidelberg)
reblog   notes:406   posted:2 years ago   tags:Science  Nature  Skygaze  Clouds  

Iridescent Clouds Over Aiguille de la Tsa

Before the sun rose over the mountains, iridescent colors danced across the sky. The unexpected light show was caused by a batch of iridescent clouds, and captured on film in early September in Arolla, Wallis, Switzerland.

Credit & Copyright: Ute Esser (U. Heidelberg)

Glowing “Ghost” Mushrooms Reappear in Brazil After 170 Years
If you think glowing mushrooms are the figment of some trippy imagination, think again. After its initial discovery back in 1840, one of the most bioluminescent species of mushroom known to humans was not seen again until a pair of primatologists recently stumbled upon it in the Brazilian forests.
Known as Neonothopanus gardneri, it’s one of the 71 recognized species of bioluminescent mushrooms — out of 100,000 identified fungi species — and can grow up to three inches in diameter. Sometimes called “ghost mushrooms” due to their eerie appearance, they are also poisonous to humans, and glow so bright that one can use their green light to read a newspaper in a dark room.
According to ScienceDaily, glowing mushrooms were first ‘discovered’ by British botanist George Gardner, who chanced across a group of boys playing with a glowing object in the streets of Vila de Natividade, Brazil. He sent some specimens back to England’s Kew Herbarium, where it was named Agaricus gardneri. It has since been reclassified and renamed Neonothopanus gardneri.
It was not until 2005 that the species was found again, this time by two primatologists, Patricia Izar of São Paulo University and Dorothy Fragaszy of the University of Georgia in Athens, who chanced upon it growing at the base of some rotting trees.
Apparently, the locals already knew of the existence of these amazing mushrooms, calling them flor-de-coco, or flower of the coconut, since it grew at the decaying parts of the pindoba, or the dwarf palm tree.
After contacting Brazilian chemist Cassius Stevani, the two scientists returned the next year to collect more specimens. Stevani, in collaboration with San Francisco State University professor of ecology and evolution Dennis Desjardin, published their findings in Mycologia on the mysterious mechanics behind these mushrooms’ glow.
As ScienceDaily explains:
Researchers believe that the fungi make light in the same way that a firefly does, through a chemical mix of a luciferin compound and a luciferase. Luciferase is an enzyme that aids the interaction among luciferin, oxygen and water to produce a new compound that emits light. But scientists haven’t yet identified the luciferin and luciferase in fungi.
"They glow 24 hours a day, as long as water and oxygen are available," Desjardin explained. "But animals only produce this light in spurts. This tells us that the chemical that is acted upon by the enzyme in mushrooms has to be readily available and abundant."

Read more on USA Today and ScienceDaily.

(via Glowing “Ghost” Mushrooms Reappear in Brazil After 170 Years : TreeHugger)

Glowing “Ghost” Mushrooms Reappear in Brazil After 170 Years

If you think glowing mushrooms are the figment of some trippy imagination, think again. After its initial discovery back in 1840, one of the most bioluminescent species of mushroom known to humans was not seen again until a pair of primatologists recently stumbled upon it in the Brazilian forests.

Known as Neonothopanus gardneri, it’s one of the 71 recognized species of bioluminescent mushrooms — out of 100,000 identified fungi species — and can grow up to three inches in diameter. Sometimes called “ghost mushrooms” due to their eerie appearance, they are also poisonous to humans, and glow so bright that one can use their green light to read a newspaper in a dark room.

According to ScienceDaily, glowing mushrooms were first ‘discovered’ by British botanist George Gardner, who chanced across a group of boys playing with a glowing object in the streets of Vila de Natividade, Brazil. He sent some specimens back to England’s Kew Herbarium, where it was named Agaricus gardneri. It has since been reclassified and renamed Neonothopanus gardneri.

It was not until 2005 that the species was found again, this time by two primatologists, Patricia Izar of São Paulo University and Dorothy Fragaszy of the University of Georgia in Athens, who chanced upon it growing at the base of some rotting trees.

Apparently, the locals already knew of the existence of these amazing mushrooms, calling them flor-de-coco, or flower of the coconut, since it grew at the decaying parts of the pindoba, or the dwarf palm tree.

After contacting Brazilian chemist Cassius Stevani, the two scientists returned the next year to collect more specimens. Stevani, in collaboration with San Francisco State University professor of ecology and evolution Dennis Desjardin, published their findings in Mycologia on the mysterious mechanics behind these mushrooms’ glow.

As ScienceDaily explains:

Researchers believe that the fungi make light in the same way that a firefly does, through a chemical mix of a luciferin compound and a luciferase. Luciferase is an enzyme that aids the interaction among luciferin, oxygen and water to produce a new compound that emits light. But scientists haven’t yet identified the luciferin and luciferase in fungi.

"They glow 24 hours a day, as long as water and oxygen are available," Desjardin explained. "But animals only produce this light in spurts. This tells us that the chemical that is acted upon by the enzyme in mushrooms has to be readily available and abundant."

Read more on USA Today and ScienceDaily.

(via Glowing “Ghost” Mushrooms Reappear in Brazil After 170 Years : TreeHugger)

reblog   source:garik  infinity-imagined   notes:202   posted:3 years ago   tags:nature  beauty  
Madagascar is amazing.
"The webs of Darwin’s Bark Spider have been found spanning rivers, streams and lakes. In one instance, a web stretched 82 feet across a Madagascar river with at least 30 insects trapped in it. In addition to the size of the webs, the silk spun by these spiders is more than two times stronger than any other known spider silk and reportedly 10 times stronger than a similarly sized piece of Kevlar.”
reblog   source:MSNBC   notes:6   posted:3 years ago   tags:spider  new species  nature  kevlar  10x stronger than kevlar  silk  spider web  Darwin  Madagascar  Bark Spider  Caerostris darwini  

Madagascar is amazing.

"The webs of Darwin’s Bark Spider have been found spanning rivers, streams and lakes. In one instance, a web stretched 82 feet across a Madagascar river with at least 30 insects trapped in it. In addition to the size of the webs, the silk spun by these spiders is more than two times stronger than any other known spider silk and reportedly 10 times stronger than a similarly sized piece of Kevlar.”

Male proboscis monkey in Bako National Park - Borneo - Malaysia - South East Asia (by Lucie et Philippe)
reblog   source:Flickr / lucie_et_philippe   notes:10   posted:3 years ago   tags:animals  monkey  lol  nose  proboscis  malaysia  asia  borneo  bako national park  cute  cute things  nature  

Male proboscis monkey in Bako National Park - Borneo - Malaysia - South East Asia (by Lucie et Philippe)

Nature (by The Chindian Photography)
reblog   source:Flickr / thechindian   notes:8   posted:3 years ago   tags:nature  meditation  psychedelic  new age  spirituality  spiritual  meditate  

This summer I plan on doing a lot of drugs

Dank (by cc6ed573eb1d200d5c6d3f47694605cf)
reblog   source:Flickr / highroulette   notes:9   posted:3 years ago   tags:weed  marijuana  dank  plant  nature  white widow  drugs  

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